Trustees for Alaska

Trustees for Alaska is a public interest environmental law firm that provides legal counsel to protect and sustain Alaska's natural environment. It represents local and national environmental groups, the state conservation voter organization, Alaska Native villages, hunters, anglers and other stakeholders. Founded in 1974, its mission is to provide legal advice and counsel on issues pertaining to oil and gas development, mining, hazardous waste management, air pollution, water pollution, public land use management and protection of marine ecosystems.

Trustees for Alaska has been a Brainerd Foundation grantee since 2000.

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Trustees for Alaska logo

Trustees for Alaska Photo gallery

Farming and rural living are the heart of the Matanuska Valley.  Photo courtesy of Tim Leach and the Mat Valley Coalition.

A mother brown bear and her two cubs in a field at Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. Photo courtesy of Trustees for Alaska.

Commercial fishermen display their feelings about the proposed Pebble Mine. Photo courtesy of Luke Strickland and Trustees for Alaska.

Trustees for Alaska Grant history

2015

$80,000 - A two year grant to protect and sustain Alaska’s natural environment. Conservation policy

2013

$60,000 - A two-year grant to protect and sustain Alaska's natural environment. Conservation policy

2011

$60,000 - A two-year grant to protect and sustain Alaska's natural environment. Conservation policy

2010

$25,000 - To provide legal services in protection of Alaska's natural heritage. Conservation policy

2009

$20,000 - To provide legal services in protection of Alaska's natural heritage. Conservation policy

2008

$35,000 - To provide legal services in protection of Alaska's natural heritage. Conservation capacity

2007

$34,000 - To provide legal services in protection of Alaska's natural heritage. Conservation capacity

2006

$25,000 - To provide legal counsel to protect and sustain Alaska's natural environment. Place-based conservation

2004

$30,000 - For general support. Place-based conservation

2003

$3,000 - To support costs incurred to file briefs to remediate heavy metal pollution of the Kavilina Village'from Red Dog mine runoff. Opportunity fund

2003

$25,000 - For general support. Conservation capacity

2001

$2,000 - To investigate reports of toxic heavy metal contamination by the Red Dog Mine. Opportunity fund

2000

$50,000 - To address the impacts of the Red Dog Mine in northwest Alaska and to help the Alaska Native village of Kivalina to challenge the proposed mine expansion. Place-based conservation

Trustees for Alaska Successes

Obama bans drilling in parts of the Arctic Ocean

Obama bans drilling in parts of the Arctic Ocean

President Barack Obama announced that he is withdrawing most of the Arctic Ocean from future oil and gas leasing under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to protect critical habitat from oil spills, to aid the transition to a clean energy future, and to help the United States meet the carbon reduction goals necessary to avert the worst effects of global climate change. Brainerd grantees Earthjustice, the Alaska Wilderness League, and Trustees for Alaska deserve much credit for this win.

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Court rules Alaska coal mining permit terminated

Court rules Alaska coal mining permit terminated

The U.S. District Court has issued a decision protecting the Matanuska Valley from unpermitted coal mining. The Court rejected the Office of Surface Mining’s (OSM) conclusion that a permit for Usibelli’s Wishbone Hill coal mine was valid. This is the final decision in a lawsuit that Brainerd grantee Trustees for Alaska filed last year to protect the Matanuska Valley and its communities from the harmful impacts of coal strip mining.

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